taylor

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Collected (719)
Playlists (17)
Tracks (80)
Narratives (160)
Videos (80)
Themes (8)
Artists (126)
Albums (238)
Singles (1)
Collected Playlists (9)
Contributions (1,760)
Rick James (40)
Cole Swindell (30)
Cocteau Twins (20)
Kodak Black (20)
Nitzer Ebb (20)
Anderson .Paak (20)
More (139)
Biography (124)
Biography (1)
Followers (10)
Following (113)

TRACKLIST

Collected by ”@taylor”

NARRATIVES

Written by “@taylor”

Through A Gay Point Of View, We All Can Universally Hear The Aching Love Expressed On Sivan’s The Blue Neighborhood

For lack of a more iconic comparison, I think its fair to equate the Troye Sivan of today with the eighties success of Boy George and Culture Club. I find that they certainly sound similar – a yearning vocal which tends to operate soulfully over New Wave arrangements. Both artists have developed a dreamscape for gay romance where both love’s power and fragility can sound truly electric – a stylistic nod to club music, albeit one that’s more melancholic and introspective. George’s “Do You Really Want To Hurt Me” is fun to dance to, but is so somber sounding as well, and so too, many tracks on The Blue Neighborhood will have you gazing at your dancing feet, grooving alone to the emotions. It’s just that type of blue mood – one which I personally have always gravitated too. It’s not all Pop perfection here though – I find the album to have several tracks that sound too similar to one another, and more frustrating for me are the silly millennial whoops and heys included on big tracks because…well, because everyone else was doing it, especially in 2015. I do my best to mentally omit the ‘wa ah ahs’ and ‘hey’ background vocals on a pretty big and moody opening track “WILD.” Honestly, why do these tired ideas creep into our Pop music? Is there really some deep seated need for us audience members to ‘sing as one’ like a children’s choir song after song, from Pop to EDM. Yep, these sonic follies, plus the annoying as hell vocal effect formanting, plus the Trap clutter on certain beats, were as trying for me back then as they are now - and perhaps even sound more frustrating listening to a song like “YOUTH” today. The beat finally drops and the sampled singing squirts and squelches over and over again, mind-numbingly. No, I am much more for the songs on The Blue Neighborhood which strove to circumvent overused trends – and with 16 joints to listen to, I thought my odds were pretty good.

Written by @taylor
Apr 25, 2019

Every Once In Awhile, A Perfect Electro Pop Comes Along Which Promotes Only Joy: Enter ‘EMOTION’

Yo, this is one of the slickest all-eighties sounding productions I have heard on a modern album (well, as modern as 2015, but you know what I mean). Intact is all the heartbreaking, monumental, and jubilant joy which, in my mind, encompasses that interesting decade, where Synth was actually an art form able to transmit soul and feeling through very artificial means. I mean, why do we respond to such faux sounds anyways? Is it because we all want to get the kiss at the end of a John Hughes movie, at the end of the day (or rather, night?) My girl Carly Rae Jepsen has seriously cornered the market on such sounds, occasionally diverging from such iconic noise here and there – but in the main, from the powerful ballad worthy vocals to the perfectly authentic synthetic noise, I really can’t find mulch cause for complaint on an album such as this – EMOTION (Deluxe). Yeah, it is actually spelled with these sort of a e s t h e t i c dot thingys in between the syllables, but that era is over, and besides, I don’t know the key commands for all that type of nonsense. I have always enjoyed her music in an ancillary fashion, familiar with her very powerful voice, definite Pop worthiness, and overall retro vibe, yet I was too preoccupied to actually give a full album justice…until now. Diving into her music, I was instantly struck how quality the production was, sort of like the Cyndi Lauper’s energy and electronic eclecticism. At the end of the day, Jepsen’s music is just so damn fun to listen to. Why on Earth in this day and age would anyone listen to Pop that is not fun like this? It has been a bad couple of years for the scene in my opinion, but I fa sho can’t wait for the new Carly Rae Jepsen album to drop this year in 2019, as it is slated. Until then, I will just be content with replaying this album over and over again, exercising my innocent girly fantasies through unabashed dance (hey, sometimes men need to let loose and have fun too.)

Written by @taylor
Apr 25, 2019

Finally, An Artist Who Understands Real R&B, Circumventing The Stale Present By Channeling Both The Past And The Future

Maaaan, I was waiting to listen to this album just as much as I have been waiting for what I consider, and most folks my age consider – ‘real’ R&B – not what has been passing as R&B for the last several years, ya dig? No, the last years have been the era of rappers auto-crooning – where at the top of the castle I must give my utmost respect to The Weeknd – because, if you haven’t already checked it out for himself, he can sing as good as Michael Jackson just backstage warming up, and wouldn’t even need the auto-tune effects if it weren’t ‘his thing’ and in so much demand these days. I could give a damn about auto-tune though – what I truly loathe at the uncreative arrangements and melodies having come out of the R&B landscape for many years – and I should have known it was the beginning of the end the year (don’t really remember when) that Drake topped the R&B Billboard charts. I was like GTFOH. Now, you can find monotone NAV and barely singing Post Malone on the same charts, but there’s also technically good singers such as Bryson Tiller and Tory Lanez representing the wave as well, except for the fact that all these artists still stick to either a wavy Toronto mode or within a Trap heavy Atlanta urbanity. Well, someone in Atlanta intends to change all of that, quiet as a quiet storm, and he name is Summer Walker. Having already immensely dug her first album, I was looking forward to this CLEAR -EP because it was to feature way jazzier exploratory grooves in the vein of Erykah Badu from the old school and Roy Ayers from the old-er-school. Walker delivered a lot of what is missing in the scene, and of course added her own modern flourishes – because rather than just looking to the past for solutions, our Soul music must also progress somewhere new.

Written by @taylor
Apr 19, 2019

Khalid Shows No Signs Of Slowing Down On Second Album ‘Free Spirit’, Determined To Maintain His Status As Voice Of The Generation

To show you how the music world works today, just realize that after only one album’s output, American Teen, Khalid was dubbed ‘Voice of his Generation’, when past artists who have held such honored titles have generally had to submit several albums and at least a few years in the biz to be recognized as such. Not in this fast paced society though. And more power to Khalid, who may or may not be in favor of such a bestowment – yet he certainly has not shunned the attention, and went forward with new material as an artist who knows what Generation Z wants to hear, even if ‘that’ sounds like the eighties coupled with some modern flair. Being a Millennial, I found past album American Teen frustratingly dull from a writing stand point, and I could personally give a damn about the lyrics, probably because the older I get, the less fucks I give about likes and texts. Plus I have never asked for a girl’s location – needy doesn’t even begin to describe such a request. Alas, such behaviors and emotions expressed through vocals and words are immensely relatable and resonate with audiences out there, whereas I find that I am more interested in the quality of the noise being produced, instantly recognizing that it was here that a ‘Millenial like myself’ could relate, and thus, I felt Free Spirit is a better sounding album, because its music is more adventurous, punctuated by moments of variety, and only a few redundant notes.

Written by @taylor
Apr 19, 2019

Lovelytheband Attempts To Not Just Sound Like Another Indie Pop Band, But Is This Wishful Thinking?

While lovelytheband sound talented and must have worked extremely hard creating a joyous synth pop experience for a listener like me to enjoy, they don’t have a terribly unique sound, as I hear influences from a slew of other artists and bands. Synth pop generally is a quite uniform genre anyways, and so bands must diversify one’s style, in terms of either joyful versus dark, or the fine tuning of electronic timbre per instrument to create a sound original to them or indicative of a nostalgic era, or making arrangements that lean towards say dance music or rock music. On album Finding It Hard to Smile, I hear a mix of Youngblood, 1975, Jamiroquai, and Empire of the Sun. Mind you, all these mentioned bands are either Australian or British, so it was a little surprising for me to discover that lovelytheband is American. I mean, their sound definitely leans towards the happy danceable pop of Australia specifically, and the British diaspora overall, and even their name is such an English thing to say; ‘lovely, this band, yeah?’ Inspirations intact, band members Mitchy Collins (vocals), Jordan Greenwald (guitars), and Sam Price (drums) are making waves in what ultimately is categorized more as the indie pop scene – and though not all songs thrill me due to some pretty canned formulas herein, there are plenty of songs to snipe some feel good jams to include on a LA Nights playlist. It makes sense that these guys are LA transplants anyways, because from the sound of it, Finding It Hard to Smile consists of 50 percent selling out and 50 percent aesthetically affecting music. I feel they are playing to win, therefore catering to the widest audience with ‘the formula’, vying for the same US mega success of Maroon 5, The Killers, Walk the Moon, and OneRepublic.

Written by @taylor
Apr 19, 2019

Swindell On His Debut Self Titled Album Takes Us On A Journey Where Love Comes And Goes, But Parties Always Rock

Of the Country Rock artists who lean towards warm Pop melodies, my money is on Cole Swindell. He just has the most crowd pleasing quality, and sounds quite talented vocally and instrumentally on his debut album entitled Cole Swindell – owning his sound by slapping his name on it. Swindell’s voice is his most powerful asset – rarely disappointing except in a couple instances here. With his authentic Georgia boy twang and boyish charm, it is hard not to like the guy, want to party with the guy, and not feel bad for the guy when his heart has been broken. He sounds both vibrantly youthful but also wisened and forlorn, and there is no note he can’t hit if he goes for it. There is a rough timbre to his vocals, but not overly so. Generally, I find that he has such an agreeable sound that I would hesitate to be too critical when the music strays into generic territory. Reading up on his personal life, I feel for the guy even more knowing that his father, without much warning, passed away in September 2013 just a month after Swindell released his first successful single “Chillin’ It”. How tragic that must have been to lose a ‘rock’ such as one’s father – and learning of this provided so much food for thought and insight for me. On the one hand, I am so happy that his father was able to see the first steps of Swindell’s career coming to fruition. On the other hand, it is a bit sad that he wouldn’t see his son’s career progress to the heights it is today – as he is recognized as one of the best names in the biz after major tours and three hit albums. That is life though – full of unexpected turns – and instead of wallowing in sadness, Swindell just ascended – I am sure partly because his father would have wanted him to.

Written by @taylor
Apr 12, 2019

Young And Talented Maestro George Ezra Brings An Old Soul To Indie Pop On ‘Wanted On Voyage’

I generally have a thing for oxymoronic cases – in this case, George Ezra looking like 18 but sounding like he is a weathered 50 year old. Have yet to hear dude speak in an interview, but he sure sings deep, and I gather that it is all deftly applied technique to hit such low, throaty, rounded vocals. The sound is nothing particularly new in Indie Pop Folk, with artists tending to go real high or real low, but Ezra’s is certainly the most listenable low throated voice I have heard in a long time, as he tackles charming singer songwriter pieces on 2014 album Wanted On Voyage. The Englishman is a lifelong fan of American music, having grown up on Bob Dylan, and through Dylan, seeking out more rootsy music in the Blues of Lead Belly and Howlin’ Wolf. So there you have it – he is channeling the past where he can. English artists, I find, love American Soul, and are quite adept at mimicking it’s tone and cadences, to the point where you wouldn’t know they are UK natives. And the UK certainly was feeling Ezra, as this debut hit number one on their charts – propelling him to super stardom. Somehow, I missed this guy’s rise, and caught instead Ed Sheeran’s – who is a force in his own right, yet I found instantly while listening to this record for the first time that I like Ezra’s style and arrangements a lot more. No missteps really here, except some eye rolling moments when the folk gets to commercial or joyous, but for the most part these songs are all well thought out and most importantly, Ezra’s voice never falters for me – which is a rarity with regards to my general feelings about Indie Folk vocalization.

Written by @taylor
Apr 12, 2019

VIDEOS

Collected by ”@taylor”

THEMES

Collected by ”@taylor”

ARTISTS

Collected by ”@taylor”

ALBUMS

Collected by ”@taylor”

SINGLES

Collected by ”@taylor”

PLAYLISTS

Collected by ”@taylor”

About

“@taylor”

Here to be my musically eclectic self.

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Following

“@taylor”