Maroon 5

57 albums, 207 tracks

Perfected by
and 10 contributors 👏
Music Videos (1,704)
Tracklist (207)
Official Music Videos (38)
Live Videos (141)
Featuring Version Videos (3)
Remix Version Videos (294)
Cover Videos (736)
Static Image Video (203)
Fancam Videos (1)
Discography (57)
You May Also Like (24)
Community (1,550)
Contributors / Perfectionists (13)
Narratives (11)
Playlists (1,526)
Contribute to this page
Biography (104)
Articles (103)
Biography (1)
Pop

Narratives

"Maroon 5"

Really old album but still carries very timely messages.

Maroon 5 is a music rock pop band that began in the early 2000’s. The group began making waves almost as soon as the group was created. This move was headed by their single “harder to breathe”. The group has kept growing stronger, although one or two persons have been replaced, the group has stayed strong producing beautiful music for all the world to enjoy. Friday the 13th is a recording of a live performance by the group (live album). Very little is known about what inspired the name of the album, some might be of the opinion that it is related to the day the album was recorded, which was on the 13th day of May, 2005. Or probably, it is something deeper, maybe something more personal. The album name was not referenced in the lyrics of the song so as to give us a little clue about the motive behind the name. Anyone that is willing to solve this puzzle will have to go to the artistes themselves. The album consists of a total of fourteen songs. The pop album is characterized by deeply insightful lyrics, classic beats and excellent vocals by Adam Levine, Jesse Carmicheal and Ryan Dusick. The songs are awesome but they do not really stick to the minds of listeners, the lyrics are extremely catchy but they just seem to have over stayed their welcome in the minds of men. The songs that really thrilled me from the album are "Through With You", "Wasted Years" and "She Will Be Loved". Contrary to the whole rock pop album, the songs are actually calm and soothing to the nerves.

May 24, 2019

The Singles Released From Maroon 5’s It Won’t Be Soon Before Long Fail to Catch My Fancy

Sometimes my favorite band releases an album where I ambivalent towards the singles they and their record company decide to release. It happens from time to time and it certainly happened when Maroon 5 released the follow-up to their excellent debut album, Songs About Jane. I admit I was a bit crestfallen, because although the band broke new ground in their sophomore effort by finally scoring a #1 hit in the US charts with “Make Me Wonder”, none of the songs the band released as singles appealed to me at the same level that “Harder to Breathe” or “This Love” did. All their four releases (“Make Me Wonder”, “If I Never See Your Face Again”, “Wake Up Call”, and “Won’t Go Home Without You’) were solid songs and it was great that the band was continuing in their evolution as artists, but none of them made me rave about the album. Unfortunately, these four songs were arranged like this in the album, #1, #2, #4 and the #5 track. Since I wasn’t really into them, I usually would not bother to listen to the rest of the album anymore and just change the CD on the rack. So for a long time, I wasn’t familiar with the second half of this album. It was only after I did a review of Songs About Jane did I start playing I Won’t be Soon Before Long again, mainly to assess if my personal biases at that time have persisted almost 12 years after I bought the CD. Well, I still feel ambivalent about the four songs released as singles from this album. However, I was wrong about giving up on the album at that time. I discovered that there were several good songs in the second half of the album. I think they were not chosen because they were not pop enough and I think that was the direction the band was aiming for at that time.

Written by @tonyfabelous from Fabelousity
May 24, 2019

A confusing title, yet a highly successful album

The American pop-rock band Maroon 5 released their sixth studio album Red Pill Blues in November 2017 through 222 Records and Interscope Records. The title came up from the science fictional concept of red pill and the blue pill that originated from the 1999 film “The Matrix”. This was their first release where they featured their multi-instrumentalist band member Sam Farrar. The standard album has a total of ten tracks that runs for an overall approximate time length of forty two minutes. However, there are five bonus tracks, adding which the time length becomes approximately sixty one minutes. The album received mixed reviews from the music critics and listeners, with an overall average rating of 58 on Metacritic. AllMusic and Rolling Stone magazine rated the album 3.5 out of 5 stars, while Financial Times and The Guardian rated it 3 out of 5 stars. Other publications like Siant Magazine and The Times rated it 2 stars. Entertainment Weekly described it as the “best and most cohesive set of the decade". Taylor Weatherby of Billboard described the album as the most electronic production that the band has ever seen and they have managed to use that in their classic Maroon 5 fashion. Financial Times praised the smooth high vocals and the catchy tunes. Pitchfork provided an average rating of 4.8 out of 10, describing the album as “smooth, professional, antiseptic soft-rock, which somehow also features Kendrick Lamar, Future, and A$AP Rocky”. However, some internet sources say that Maroon 5 later regretted having the album title as Red Pill Blues which also happened to be the name of a very controversial Men’s rights activist movement. A significant number of guests were featured in this album within production, songwriting, instrumentals and vocals. The album received significant commercial success. It peaked at number two on the US Billboard 200 and Billboard Canadian albums, and at number one on Gaon music chart (South Korean International albums). Other than this, the album was featured in many music charts across the world and reached within the top ten positions in countries like Australia, Denmark, Czech Republic, Japan, New Zealand, Norway and Slovakia. The artwork concept of the album is also very interesting, which shows all the seven members of the band pictured on Polaroid photographs with Snapchat filters, which have become a mainstream social media culture. Overall, being a mainstream pop album, it can be said that it has already received significant success.

Written by @Soulbyweekly from SoulByweekly
May 24, 2019

Red Pill Blues by Maroon 5, the future that never came

In the year of 2002, I came across an album called Songs About Jane the name of the band: Maroon 5, to be honest, it caught my attention for several reasons, it was an album that featured outstanding performances by all members of the band, a singer with a voice not very versatile but original, and interesting topics with details that did not necessarily intend to comply with the commercial rules. Before pleasing everyone, Maroon 5 wanted to please himself. That is the key for a group to stand out, first of all, to satisfy their own needs and feel happy with the result of their effort embodied in the album, the rest will come later. At that time, I thought that the future of the band would be the production of songs with higher quality, that their evolution would be great and that of course, the commercial success would also be part of their reward. I imagined (as I imagine now) that all musicians who struggle with all their might during their adolescence and youth to reach a place in the public's taste, dream that, at the moment when money enters their pockets, the opportunities for refining and for perfecting their style by playing one or several instruments, as well as singing, will open up and you will not lose a single opportunity to grow musically and artistically. Having the time and economic tranquility to listen to more music, take classes within their discipline, expand the repertoire of instruments, gain knowledge to improve the sound you are looking for and relate to innovative recording techniques is pure gold. Enriching yourself individually increases the value of the band. There are great examples of this, and the truth is a reason to give a wide recognition to all those musicians who capture their evolution and love of music, and to their band in each new album they deliver. Of course, every star of Pop and Rock, as well as other musical styles, also looks forward to the moment of success and the arrival of money, for parties and girls, is part of the dream of every young person who wants to make a career in music, but it's not everything. There are those who also dream of social activism and the performance of other artistic expressions and I believe that everything is valid. What I think is reprehensible, is to let the future reach you and you can not show anything better than what you did at the beginning or, worse, show a clear setback in your quality as an artist and make it clear that the only thing that mattered was the commercial success. It's disappointing when you see something like that. I think that is the case with Maroon 5.

Written by @JorgeDiaz from Electro Arpegio
May 24, 2019

Official Music Videos

"Maroon 5"

Discography

"Maroon 5"

Live Videos

"Maroon 5"

Featuring Version Videos

"Maroon 5"

Remix Version Videos

"Maroon 5"

Cover Videos

"Maroon 5"

Static Image Video

"Maroon 5"

Fancam Videos

"Maroon 5"

Articles

"Maroon 5"

Biography

"Maroon 5"

Active

    1994–present

Label

  • Reprise
  • Warner Bros.
  • Octone
  • J
  • A&M Octone
  • 222
  • Interscope

About

Maroon 5 is an American pop rock band from Los Angeles, California. It currently consists of lead vocalist Adam Levine, keyboardist and rhythm guitarist Jesse Carmichael, bassist Mickey Madden, lead guitarist James Valentine, drummer Matt Flynn, keyboardist PJ Morton, and multi-instrumentalist Sam Farrar. Original members Levine, Carmichael, Madden, and drummer Ryan Dusick first came together as Kara's Flowers in 1994, while they were still in high school. After self-releasing their independent album We Like Digging?, the band signed to Reprise Records and released the album The Fourth World in 1997. The album garnered a tepid response, after which the record label dropped the band and the members focused on college.
Continue reading at Wikipedia...

You May Also Like

Contributors / Perfectionists

Want To Contribute To This Page?

Thanks to the perfectionists
and 10 contributors,

this page is filled with amazing content!

Let’s work together to continue perfecting it for everyone! Below you’ll find the available Tracklistings for this Artist which you can Contribute to. Just select a song & add the version you would like to submit!
Contributor Ranking
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
  • 1
    needed
    needed
    needed
    needed
    needed
    needed
    needed
  • Did We Miss A Song In “Memories - Single”?
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
  • 1
    needed
    1
    needed
    needed
    1
    needed
    needed
  • Did We Miss A Song In “Three Little Birds - Single”?
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
OfficialStatic ImageLiveFancamRemixFeaturingUser Cover
Did We Miss an Album of “Maroon 5”?