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Kane Brown

Narratives(6)

May 17, 2019

When One’s MultiRacial Identity can be a Trump Card in One’s Career: Kane Brown, Not Quite White in a Genre Mainly Associated With White American Artists

Filipinos my age grew up listening to the hits of American country superstars Dolly Parton, Kenny Rogers, Crystal Gayle, John Denver, and Restless Heart. After that golden era here, only a handful of country artists were able to break through here and most of them were women - Taylor Swift, Carrie Underwood, Alison Krauss, Faith Hill, and Shania Twain. Other than them, it would be difficult for most ordinary Filipinos to know contemporary country acts from America. That is why listening to country music at that early age has led me to make it a lifetime habit, although lately, it has become more off than on. Last decade was the last time I actively listened to American country music due largely to the Dixie Chicks, Lady Antebellum, and Tim McGraw. Last year though, I stumbled into a gem of a country song called What Ifs, located the singer, who turned out to be Kane Brown and made a question mark through my ledft eyebrow when he did not look white to me. Well, country music, as I knew it growing up, is as white as white can be and very rarely have they accommodated multiracial or African-American artists. Darius Rucker is the only other non-white country performer that I know. However, music is evolving everywhere and the idea that Kane Brown who is multiracial, and is still able to sing country music like any other white country singer, is not anymore much of an issue nowadays, at least not to me. Bottom line always in music is, if the music is good, how the singer looks become secondary – and boy, what a great debut album Kane Brown pieced together, singing themes close to the heart of country music – love of family, love of country, and love of freedom.

Written by @tonyfabelous from Fabelousity
Mar 18, 2019

Coming A Out A Year After His Self Titled Album, Kane Brown (Deluxe Edition) Adds Four More Tracks For Your Modern Country Enjoyment

While I’m not blown away by the sounds of Modern Country, I feel like giving my brotha Kane Brown another spin and revisiting his self titled album now that it adds several songs to the experience. The deep baritone is still intact, and while I have heard some commentators complain that the young man sounds pretty flat here and there, I would say that in the low register where he is most powerful and compelling – and that is his whole modus operandi anyways listening to his catalogue. Vocally speaking, of any of the new artists on the scene, I actually find Kane Brown’s to sound very traditional and masculine, and therefore don’t understand some of the hate, saying he is not Country, etc. Hell – are they even listening to this cat’s serious cowboy drawl? Sometimes it can sound borderline caricature, like actor Sam Elliot singing in a Coen Brothers’ western themed dark comedy. Of course, there are plenty of alternative examples of Kane Brown going the other direction depending on the demands of the track; on “Hometown”, the energy is explosive and club-worthy, with the singer aiming for higher notes on the celebratory hooks which better match the distinct mix of Electronica and Rock rhythm. And on an even poppier example “What Ifs”, Kane Brown can be heard employing both singing high and low styles on one individual track – which may not be my favorite arrangement on Kane Brown (Deluxe Edition), but is definitely a worthy example of his exciting brand of Country Pop. Mind you, this isn’t the type of music that I would personally bump, even if I had a Tacoma truck, but I can certainly see it’s mainstream appeal, as in this regard, most of the tracks get the job done.

Written by @taylor

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